Campaigns

Including Cycling UK's Space For Cycling campaign

and Cycling UK's Local Cycle Campaigning Network

On this page you'll find issues that affect us as cyclists' right across the county.

Melanie Carroll is our Campaigns Officer and will be our 'Point Of Contact'.

CAMPAIGNS OFFICER'S REPORT

You can download and read Melanie's latest 'Campaigns Officer's Report' (November 2019) HERE

We would ask that any and all our members to also write to the council or other agencies when they become aware of issues that may effect themselves or other cyclists, as well as letting us know. It is no longer enough for just the voice of Cycling UK Lincolnshire to speak out, to ensure that we are heard and our needs appreciated it also needs many individual letters because each letter counts. Gone are the days when a membership organisation letter counted for the many. Now they need many letters from individuals to really make them take notice.

 
The work continues on and again I'd ask all Members to be active campaigners for cycle provision and safety and keep an eye on any proposed changes in their areas. Let us know too anything that we should be aware of, be it an accident blackspot, a proposed change to roads or right of ways, a new building works or estate or any other issue that needs the needs of the bicycle rider being kept front and centre.

A QUICK GUIDE TO BASIC CAMPAIGNING THAT EVERYONE CAN DO

Melanie's written 'A quick guide to basic campaigning that everyone can do' and you can download and read the article HERE

DISTRICT COUNCIL CONTACT INFORMATION

For contact information within East Lindsey, North East Lincolnshire and North Lincolnshire,

you can download and read the article HERE

CAMPAIGNS ARCHIVE 2020

February 12th 2020

Government pledge £5bn over the next five years to improve bus and cycling services in England.

 

Following on from the promise by the government to spend £350 million on cycling to create 250 miles of new cycle paths outside London and to double rates of cycling by 2025, there has been much debate as to how much is actually needed to be invested. Cycling UK suggests a further £6-8bn is needed, as well as new design standards for infrastructure.
Cycling UK Lincolnshire's 'Right to Ride' Officer Melanie Carroll talked to Melvyn Prior on BBC Radio Lincolnshire's Melvyn in the Morning programme (BBC Sounds-BBC Radio Lincolnshire Melvyn in the Morning 12/02/20).

Listen to the broadcast HERE

(Her chat starts about 1 hour 11 minutes into the broadcast).

Report by Duncan Dollimore, Cycling UK Head of Campaigns

There’s billions here and billions there, but is it for buses or is it for bikes? And is it new money, or sound a bit funny? Is it Boris the Bike or a whole load of hype? Will it get people cycling and do what it ought, or be deeply frustrating and fall so far short? 

Duncan Dollimore, Cycling UK Head of Campaigns explains:

"Cycling UK has been asking the Government to show us the money for cycling and walking for years, so you might expect me to be excited about the Prime Minister’s announcement on Tuesday. Five billion pounds of new funding to overhaul bus and cycle links for every region in England outside London. What’s not to like?

Millions to Billions - linking bikes to buses

Sadly, when it comes to money for active travel it pays to follow the figures not the headline. The warning bells rang when funding for buses and cycling were merged. I’m sure it’s been done before, but funding for active travel is usually referenced separately to the bus budget, because they’re different. Lumping them together is a great way to hide the truth with a bigger number!

I probably should point out that the announcement doesn’t actually reference funding for walking, but does say that dozens of new ‘Mini-Holland’ schemes “will be taken forward to transform town centres to make them safer to get around”, so we can only assume, unless or until there’s some clarification, that whatever slice of the £5 billion cake is earmarked for cycling is in reality the cycling and walking portion – but is it a sliver or a slab?

How much of the £5 billion would be spent on cycling was the question the Prime Minister was asked by Ruth Cadbury MP, co-chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Cycling and Walking (APPGCW), after he made his announcement to Parliament. His answer was “in the first stage, £350 million”. 

 

Known knowns and known unknowns

Now as Donald Rumsfeld once said, there are known knowns and known unknowns. The £350 million slice of the cake for cycling is a known known, whether there’ll be anything after that is a known unknown. There could be, but unless and until the Government clarifies this, and makes a commitment, all I can say is that what was announced for cycling yesterday wasn’t £5 billion or a sizeable chunk of that, just £350 million from a five-year funding pot.

If that sounds a little harsh, and you’re wondering whether I should be patient and a little more trusting, and perhaps wait to see what follows in the March Budget or the anticipated Government Spending Review in the summer, I’d suggest that waiting for proper investment in active travel is like waiting for Godot. Nothing ever happens, so the abject failure to fund cycling and walking continues. I’m sick of waiting.

Half a mile for each constituency

Of course, £350 million sounds like a lot of money, but it isn’t in transport infrastructure terms. That’s clear from the reference in the announcement to building “over 250 miles of new, high-quality separated cycle routes”, which led Chelmsford MP Vicky Ford to press the Prime Minister for an assurance that Essex and the East wouldn’t miss out on new investment and infrastructure. He obliged, but nobody seems to have done the maths. With 460 parliamentary constituencies in England outside London, if Vicky’s constituency gets a fair share her constituents can expect 0.54 miles of new routes. Hardly an active travel network.

In contrast, Andy Burnham and Chris Boardman’s Bee Network plan for Greater Manchester involves a fully joined up cycling and walking network covering 1,800 miles. OK, they don’t yet have funding to deliver all of that, but 400 miles of it is either already being built or in development, whereas across the rest of England, as Chancellor Sajid Javid's response to Ben Bradshaw MP’s question on Tuesday laid bare, the Government’s current commitment is woefully inadequate, as “more than 250 miles” actually turns out to mean just 250 miles.

Working out exactly how much money has been spent on cycling and walking, and how much is being set aside for future spending, isn’t straightforward.

Smoke and mirrors

"Working out exactly how much money has been spent on cycling and walking, and how much is being set aside for future spending, isn’t straightforward. That’s partly because, as Ruth Cadbury explains in her blog on how to invest in cycling, much of the funding planned for active travel is merely an assumed proportion of an existing budget rather than funding directly from the Department for Transport (DfT) that’s ring-fenced for cycling and walking.

Consequently, Government estimates of future spending have to be looked at with a degree of caution, which is why we’ve been campaigning so hard for long-term funding that’s specifically set aside for local authorities to enable them to deliver their local cycling and walking infrastructure plans (LCWIPS), and doesn’t involve a competitive tendering process. Exactly what the evidence shows is needed.

So, I was cautious last Friday when the Government issued a press release suggesting that expected spending on cycling and walking from 2016 to 2021 had doubled to £2.4 billion. MPs without a full grasp of the figures or what’s been announced previously might readily conclude that it’s an increase, a big number, and therefore evidence that the Government is taking investment in active travel seriously. But headline figures can mask reality.

The truth is that we just don’t understand the £2.4 billion estimate. The Government had previously said the five-year investment figure to April 2021 would be just short of £2bn, with an annual average of around £390m per year. The inference is that another £400 million has been found, but it’s unclear whether that’s money it estimates has been spent in the last four years, but which hasn’t previously been accounted for as active travel spending, or whether this is new money it now thinks will be spent in the year from April 2020 onwards. If the latter, perhaps it's factoring in extra funding which local authorities have secured for cycling and walking from the Transforming Cities Fund, but that’s just a guess.

£350 million – and buses!

The truth is we just don’t know, and we couldn’t understand last week why, if the Government was suddenly planning to spend twice as much on cycling and walking next year than the average for the last four, it wasn’t trumpeting that clearly rather than obscuring the spending for 2020/21 in a five-year total figure. But, whilst we were working that one out, the Prime Minister jumped in announcing £5 billion for buses and cycling, which now looks like only £350 million specifically set aside for active travel.

I know, the Government has said that £5 billion, or whatever slice of it goes to cycling and walking, is new money, in addition to existing funding streams, but I don’t know what to add this to, because as I’ve already outlined, we don’t understand the estimates of future spending!

What we know for certain is that the only capital funding for active travel referred to within the Conservative manifesto last year was £350 million for a cycling infrastructure fund, which sounds suspiciously like the £350 million that wasn’t on the side of a bus, but which Boris Johnson confirmed is the cycling element of the £5 billion bus and cycling fund.

The report we aren’t allowed to see!

I couldn’t let some of the Government figures about estimated spending and funding for buses and cycling go unchallenged, but neither should we forget the big picture. At no level, with any of their funding proposals and however the cake is sliced, is the Government getting anywhere near the level of investment in active travel that’s needed to achieve its own Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy (CWIS) targets to double levels of cycling, and they know it.

Former Transport Minister Jesse Norman MP admitted this last year whilst giving evidence to the Transport Select Committee, candidly acknowledging that meeting the CWIS targets would require a doubling of investment, which he wanted to do and the Government ought to commit to. He was moved to a different Ministry a few weeks later.

It’s reasonable to conclude that Jesse Norman’s evidence was informed by the evidence gathered by Lynn Sloman from Transport for Quality of Life (TfQL), who was commissioned by the DfT to report on what needed to be done and the level of investment required for the Government to achieve its CWIS targets. We’d expected the TfQL report to be published before Lynn Sloman spoke at an APPGCW debate on active travel funding last April, but ten months on and despite numerous parliamentary questions asking when the Government intends to do so, the report has still not been published.

What we need - £6 to £8 billion

It’s not difficult to work out what the report is going to say. A week ago the Government put to Parliament its first report on progress made towards delivering the Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy, along with a host of reports, cases studies and evidence including the reports on the model of the impacts cycling and walking investment from TfQL’s research but without the TfQL report.

That said, the DfT’s own figures show that what’s needed is at least £6 billion more over the next five years, and for the avoidance of doubt, that’s at least £6 billion over and above the £2.4 billion estimated spending in the five years up to March 2021.

So, the Government knows that this is the level of investment needed, and in advance of the Budget on 11 March, Cycling UK and the Walking and Cycling Alliance explained to the Treasury why sustained, secure, long-term investment of between £6-8 billion over a five-year period is needed, putting an end to stop-start funding. We just need the Treasury to get on board and fund what the DfT is telling them is needed, and for someone in Government to allow the DfT to publish the TfQL report to end the smoke and mirrors and spell out clearly and in simple terms the type and level of investment needed to get more people moving more actively and achieve the CWIS targets.   

Take action

If reading this makes you anywhere near as frustrated as I am about delay, and the failure to adequately fund something which is so clearly part of the answer to our various air pollution, climate, inactivity-related public health and congestion crises, then you can help and take action by contacting your MP in the run up to the budget on the 11 March.

There’s a danger that some MPs think that announcements over the last week mean that the Government’s got cycling and walking done and fixed the funding problem. Nothing could be further from the truth"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 13th 2020

Cycle England - an update.

Back in November 2018, Cycling UK Lincolnshire was involved in a number of workshops following on from government funding 

to create new bookable cycling packages in Lincolnshire and Yorkshire, targeting the Dutch and German leisure holidaymakers. Working with tour operators the new packages have been launched over the last year. Tim Newbery interviewed Visit Lincoln's Hayley Toyne (Cycle England Project Manager) on February 13th 2020 and she gave an update on the project.

Although funding from 'phase one' has now finished, four new long distance cycle routes across Lincolnshire have been developed or are under development. 

Route1.

Historic Lincoln and Surrounding Area.

View and download published route HERE

Route 2.

Explore The Lincolnshire Coast (Humber to The Wash)

(Under development)

View and download proposed route HERE

Route 3.

Lincolnshire Wolds Cycle Routes

View and download published routes HERE

Route 4.

Belton to Stamford

(Under development, route to be presented to the trade at the end of February 2020)

Each route has a suggested itinerary of 4-5 days and two of the routes are currently being marketed to the Dutch and German tourists. Route 2 has yet to be confirmed and may undergo a few alterations. Route 4 is in the early stages of development.

It is hoped that funding for the second round will be available soon with the emphasis on targeting the UK visitor market.

The cycling holidays, which are due to launch in June 2020, have already secured hundreds of advanced accommodation bookings from travel giant TUI Holidays. The new cycling holidays were secured through Visit England’s Discover England Fund (DEF) programme in 2018.

“This is the first time that people can book a complete Lincolnshire cycling holiday online,” said Hayley Toyne from Visit Lincoln. “Four new cycling routes have been created which include the most scenic parts of Lincolnshire, as well as overnight accommodation, places to eat and experiences along the way. The bid to secure funding was extremely competitive, but we submitted a joint proposal with Welcome To Yorkshire and secured over £1 million to develop bookable packages that would become sustainable.”

Over the past 12 months Visit Lincoln and Welcome to Yorkshire have been marketing the new cycling holidays to travel agents by attending trade shows, delivering international marketing campaigns and PR. A familiarisation trip in Spring 2019 saw a travel representative from TUI Holidays come to Lincolnshire to test the routes out for themselves. This resulted in around 300 advance hotel room bookings.

Andrew Smith, Managing Director at the Ashbourne Hotel in North Killingholme said: “It’s just fantastic - from the beginning we wanted to be involved, and to see the bookings come through is reward for everyone’s hard work.

“To bring the package together we joined forces with Visit Lincoln, other hotels, food providers and attractions. By working together we have managed to deliver something that we could never have done on our own. It’s been good for our business and good for Lincolnshire. It’s a very exciting time.”

 

More information HERE and also  Visit Lincoln

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blueprint for improving travel and transport in Lincoln revealed

Published: 17th February 2020

Reduced city centre traffic, better public transport and improved facilities for cyclists and pedestrians are all part of the new vision for the future of transport in Lincoln.

Lincolnshire County Council, working in partnership with City of Lincoln Council, North Kesteven District Council and West Lindsey District Council, has drawn up a new strategy for Lincoln that aims to improve transport and support future development to 2036 and beyond.

The draft strategy is set to be reviewed by the county council’s Highways and Transport Scrutiny Committee on Monday 9 March.

Cllr Richard Davies, executive member for highways, said: "One of the main goals behind Lincoln's new transport strategy is to offer a wider range of affordable, reliable and environmentally-friendly travel options for people to choose from when moving in and around the city.

"This will lead to more people using alternative forms of transport, resulting in less congestion and better air quality in the city centre, making Lincoln a more prosperous, attractive and healthier place to live, learn, work and visit."

Some of the proposals within the strategy include:

  • Completing Lincoln's ring road by constructing the North Hykeham Relief Road

  • Providing high-quality, traffic-free routes for pedestrians and cyclists

  • Improving the A46 to the north and west of Lincoln

  • Enhancing walking and cycling infrastructure within Lincoln

  • Creating 'mobility hubs' around the city that offer a range of transport options from a single location

  • Enhancing Lincoln’s historic core by improving the area around Broadgate and Wigford Way/St Mary's Street

  • Installing additional electrical charging points in and around the city to increase uptake in electric vehicles

  • Improving bus priority around the city via new bus lanes and new routes

  • Continue improving the area's rail service by increasing and adding new services to other urban areas

Cllr Davies continued: "This strategy provides a number of proposals for us, developers and planners to consider over the next fifteen years as we strive towards meeting growth targets for the area that include approximately 37,000 new dwellings and 12,000 new jobs up to 2036.

"Getting the North Hykeham Relief Road built as dual carriageway is a top priority, as it will help cut congestion, open up new development land and better connect the rest of the country to Lincolnshire’s coast.

"Another proposal in the strategy, probably one of our most ambitious, is to build a set of mobility hubs at key points outside the city.

"In essence, these would serve as an interchange for people travelling into Lincoln by offering alternative means of travelling into the city centre by car.

"For example, the hubs might include a city centre bus shuttle, electric-vehicle charging, Park & Bike, e-bike hire and delivery lockers.

“Combined with other measures, like improving bus and rail services, the strategy aims to ensure Lincoln has the infrastructure it needs to meet travel demands over the coming decades.

“The challenge now is finding the funding needed to make these improvements a reality. And the only way we’re going to be able to do that is if everyone gets behind the plan and works together.”

For more information or to view and dowload the strategy summary, visit www.lincolnshire.gov.uk/lincoln-transport-strategy.

 

Published: 17th February 2020

February 20th 2020

North East Lincolnshire Council - Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan - UPDATE

Cycling UK Lincolnshire's Tim Newbery spoke with the Communities Scrutiny Panel to obtain the latest news on North East Lincolnshire Council's Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP). They confirmed that they are continuing to monitor the progress and published a briefing on 15th November 2019. Although they are pleased with the progress, they confirmed that  there's no record of the first draft having been presented for consultation.

The development of North East Lincolnshire Council's Local Transport Plan 2020 allows for the integration of the LCWIP into the wider transport policy. It was hoped that transport Officers would finalise the FIRST draft of the LCWIP soon after Christmas with the intention of undertaking internal and public consultation and engagement with the Portfolio Holder for Environment and Transport, ahead of the FINAL draft report being considered by cabinet in March 2020. Senior Transport Officer Anthony Snell is the lead officer but was unavailable for comment.

View the Communities Scrutiny Panel Report November 2019 HERE

February 26th 2020

Drop In Meeting North East Lincolnshire Council, Cleethorpes Town Hall

Tim Newbery had an opportunity to discuss the Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan with Cllr Stewart Swinburn: Portfolio Holder for Environment and Transport North East Lincolnshire. Further from discussions with Anthony Snell back in November, Cllr Swinburn confirmed that discussions are ongoing. A budget of £3.4 million had been set for the Local Transport Plan 2020, £415,000 of which is destined for the Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan. This will hopefully be sanctioned by Cabinet on 11th March 2020, after which the DRAFT will be passed onto the Communities Scrutiny Panel. All being well, a period of public consultation will follow.

 

It was noted that public consultation on The Rights Of Way Improvement Plan has just started and remains open until Monday 1st June 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

Canal and River Trust - East Midlands Waterway Forum (North)

9th March 2020, Newark Town Hall.

Cycling UK Lincolnshire were invited to the annual Waterway Forum for the North of the East Midlands. The aim was to invite as many representatives from across the community as possible, from cycling groups, walking groups, boaters and local businesses.

It was an opportunity for the Canal and River Trust to discuss its priorities and promote the use of the network and improve the services on offer. The forum (North) covers the River Witham, Fosdyke Canal, Grantham Canal, River Trent and Upper Trent.

22 delegates had booked to attend the meeting, sadly only 5 were able to attend. It’s a shame those who couldn’t make it, failed to send their apologies. Representing CTC East Midlands and Cycling UK Lincolnshire was Tim Newbery, whilst Hugh McClintock represented ‘Pedals’: Nottingham Cycle Campaign.

There are almost 300 miles of canals, rivers and waterside routes across the East Midlands. “Adding water to your cycling routes makes all the difference” is a key slogan being promoted by the Canal and River Trust although it was highlighted that the core purpose of the trust is ‘care and maintenance’ which consumes the greater part of the budget and most of the volunteers time and effort.

There were presentations of the work that had been carried out during the past 12 months including the £12,000 spent on towpath improvements at Saxilby, facilities for Glamping at Foxton, access improvements to the towpaths in Nottingham City Centre and work being carried out to improve facilities in Loughborough.  

Future projects will include improvements to car parking facilities at Torksey and Boston. It was noted that there are ongoing works to make access to the towpaths easier for bicycles and wheelchairs for example. The aim is to widen the metal barriers or remove them altogether in a similar manner to Sustrans on their network, to make the towpaths accessible to everyone.

The last hour of the meeting consisted of an ‘activity feedback’ open discussion session to revue what the Canal and River Trust is doing well, what can be improved and how to attract new users. It was agreed that better communication is required, via the website and social media outlets, especially to alert users of works being carried out on the waterways and towpaths and when closures or diversions had been set up. It was acknowledged that the towpaths are used by a diverse range of users each with their own needs and that all users should be respectful of each other. Common courtesy should prevail at all times. There was a perception from Boaters for example, that a minority of cyclists cycled at a dangerous speed, disregarding the safety of other users. Improved signage might alert and promote cyclists of alternative routes for ‘fast commuting’. On longer sections of towpath, there might also be better provision of places to rest and enjoy the water network. Benches and picnic tables could be installed at appropriate locations.

For further information, see: canalrivertrust.org.uk

Jo Grummet, Customer Service Manager, has agreed to be our point of contact:

East Midlands Address: The Kiln, Mather Road, Newark NG24 1FB

Mobile: 07826941916

Email: jo.grummett@canalrivertrust.org.uk

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In accordance with Government and Cycling UK directives, all Cycling UK Lincolnshire activities are suspended until further notice